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    You are here : Home » MS Research News » General Health » Denture Cream

    Denture Cream

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    Excess use of denture cream tied to nerve damage

    DenturesDenture Creams Such As Super Poligrip, Fixodent and Others, May Be Associated With Side Effects Such As Paralysis, Numbness, Tingling, Muscle Weakness And Other Neurological Issues.

    There have been numerous reports of people experiencing paralysis, developing numbness, tingling in hands, loss of sensation or unexplained pain and muscle weakness in legs and arms, as well as numerous other neurological problems as a possible result of the zinc in Super Poligrip, Fixodent and other denture creams.

    Symptoms of Zinc Poisoning

    Exposure to excess zinc can cause paralysis, unexplained pain and muscle weakness, numbness, loss of sensation or other neurological symptoms. Denture cream users who experience such symptoms should consult their doctor. Typical symptoms of zinc poisoning include:

    Numbness and Tingling:

    Zinc poisoning can lead to conditions called paresthesias and dysesthesias. Paresthesias leads to feelings of numbness, tingling, pinching, sharp, deep stabs, electric shocks, or buzzing in the arms and legs. Dysesthesias refers to unpleasant abnormal sensations that occur when a patient touches something.
    Impaired Sense of Position:

    Because of the numbness in their feet, victims of zinc poisoning may lack coordination when walking.
    "Glove and Stocking Sensation":

    Patients may have a feeling of wearing stockings or gloves or slippers even though their hands and feet are completely bare.
    Weakness in the Arms or Legs:

    The copper deficiency that accompanies zinc poisoning can damage the nerves leading to the legs and arms. This can cause difficulty walking or running, and a feeling of "heaviness" in the legs. These symptoms can make walking and other daily functions quite difficult.

    Diagnosis that may be determined due to Zinc Poisoning

    Dysesthesias

    Dysesthesias refers to unpleasant abnormal sensations that occur when a patient touches something, or is exposed to some other type of stimulus. Dysesthesias is associated with lesions of the peripheral or central nervous system, and causes patients to feel burning, wetness, itching, electric shock, "pins and needles" and other uncomfortable sensations in their extremities, especially their hands and feet.
    Paresthesias

    Paresthesias leads to feelings of numbness, tingling, pinching, sharp, deep stabs, electric shocks, or buzzing in the arms and legs. While the symptoms of parenthesis are similar to dysesthesias, a patient with paresthesias does not have to come in contact with a stimulus in order to experience its symptoms. Other types of paresthesias include feelings of cold, warmth, burning, itching, and skin crawling.
    Copper Deficiency

    Exposure to excess zinc inhibits the absorption of copper. Fatigue, paleness, skin sores, edema, slowed growth, hair loss, anorexia, diarrhea and dermatitis can be symptoms of copper deficiency. Copper deficiency can also affect the immune and cardiovascular systems. The condition also can cause reduced red blood cell function and reduced red blood cell life span, which can lead to impaired energy levels and cause weakness and labored respiration from decreased oxygen delivery.

    Anemia

    One of the more common blood disorders, anemia occurs when the level of healthy red blood cells in the body becomes too low. This can lead to health problems, including fatigue and impaired bodily organs, because red blood cells contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the body's tissues.

    Bone Marrow Failure

    Bone marrow failure syndromes include a group of disorders than can be either inherited or acquired. These diseases are disorders of the hematopoietic stem cell that can involve either one cell line or all of the cell lines (erythroid for red cells, myeloid for white blood cells, megakaryocytic for platelets).
    Neuropathy

    Severe zinc poisoning can lead to neuropathy, a condition that affects the nerves. Symptoms of neuropathy vary, but may include numbness or tingling in the feet, legs, hands, and/or arms; a reduction in strength or ability to move legs or feet, or arms and hands; unexplained pain in the extremities; a tendency to stumble or fall down; instability and lack of balance; or a change or decrease in walking stride. Severe neuropathy can even lead to abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, reduced ability to perspire, constipation, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction.

    These neurological problems caused by excess exposure to zinc contained in denture creams can be devastating. In some cases, patients suffering from zinc poisoning have been confined to wheelchairs. Tests for zinc levels in the blood can determine quickly if a zinc overdose is to blame.

    Severe zinc poisoning can lead to neuropathy, a condition that affects the nerves. Symptoms of neuropathy vary, but may include numbness or tingling in the feet, legs, hands, and/or arms; a reduction in strength or ability to move legs or feet, or arms and hands; unexplained pain in the extremities; a tendency to stumble or fall down; instability and lack of balance; or a change or decrease in walking stride. Severe neuropathy can even lead to abnormal blood pressure and heart rate, reduced ability to perspire, constipation, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction.
    "Neurology" Report Links Zinc Poisoning to Denture Cream Use

    In August 2008, the journal "Neurology" published a report on four denture cream users who developed severe neurological problems. The authors of the report, researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, determined that the patients' symptoms were caused by their exposure to zinc in denture cream.

    The "Neurology" article noted that one tube of denture cream should last 3 to 10 weeks, but patients in the report were all using at least two tubes a week. Three had also lost their teeth at a relatively young age, meaning they had used "extremely large amounts of denture adhesive daily for years."

    All of the patients had abnormally high levels of zinc in their blood, accompanied by abnormally low levels of copper. Normal blood levels of copper range from 0.75 to 1.45 micrograms per milliliter (mL), but levels for the patients in the report ranged from less than 0.1 to 0.23 micrograms per mL. The top normal number for zinc blood levels is 1.10 micrograms per mL, but patients had levels ranging from 1.36 to 4.28 micrograms per mL. High levels of zinc can deplete copper in the body. This combination will lead to serious neurological problems.

    Such excessive use of denture cream is not unusual. Many people with ill-fitting dentures use large amounts of these products to deal with the problem. Unfortunately, as our denture cream zinc poisoning lawyers have found, manufacturers are unwilling to disclose the amount or type of zinc in their products. Consumers have no way of knowing that overuse of these products can endanger their health.

    According to the University of Texas researchers, the denture creams the four patients used had zinc concentrations between 17,000 and 34,000 micrograms per gram. Based on the patients' denture cream use, the researchers estimated that they were exposed to at least 330 mg of zinc daily, far more than the recommended daily allowance of 8 mg for women and 11 mg for men. The National Academy of Sciences stated in 2001 that the largest daily tolerable zinc intake is 40 mg.

    Unfortunately, as the "Neurology" report illustrates, the neurological damage caused by denture cream zinc poisoning is not always reversible. To treat symptoms, one patient took copper supplements but didn't stop using denture cream. His copper levels improved, but his zinc levels remained too high and he showed no improvement in his neurological symptoms. A second patient, who took copper supplements and stopped using denture cream showed improvement in copper and zinc levels, but no improvement in neurological symptoms.

    Another patient's neurological symptoms included weakness in the hands and poor balance, while another had weakness in her arms and legs that made her wheelchair dependent, along with cognitive decline and urinary incontinence. These patients showed "mild neurologic improvement" after they quit using denture cream and began taking copper supplements.
    Possible Misdiagnoses of Denture Cream Neuropathy

    Studies have shown that zinc copper deficiency can cause the myelin sheath that covers the nerve cells to deteriorate. This would explain the neurological problems, such as neuropathy, that can occur because of zinc in denture cream.

    Many doctors are not aware that denture creams can cause zinc poisoning, copper depletion and neuropathy. Because of this, a patient exhibiting numbness or tingling in the extremities; muscle weakness, muscle spasms, or difficulty in moving; or any other of the problems typical of denture cream neuropathy may not be correctly diagnosed.

    Our denture cream neuropathy lawyers are aware of several instances where people suffering from zinc copper deficiency were misdiagnosed with other disorders that involve destruction of the myelin sheath. Some of the demyelinating diseases most often misdiagnosed in patients with denture cream neuropathy include:

    Multiple Sclerosis: People with denture cream neuropathy are often suspected to be suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. This is not surprising, as Multiple Sclerosis affects more than 400,000 people in the U.S. Many of the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis are identical to those of zinc copper depletion. Multiple sclerosis can be difficult to diagnose early in the course of the disease, because symptoms often come and go - sometimes disappearing for months.

    Demyelinating Syndrome: This syndrome is often associated with other diseases, such as lupus. Typical symptoms include odd sensation in legs, arms, chest, or face, such as tingling or numbness, or weakness; blurriness or double vision; loss of dexterity; and coordination problems.

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP): A rare neurological disorder in which there is swelling of nerve roots and destruction of the myelin sheath over the nerves. This disorder causes weakness, paralysis and/or impairment in motor function, especially of the arms and legs. Sensory loss may also be present causing numbness, tingling, or prickling sensations. The motor and sensory impairments usually affect both sides of the body, and the degree of severity may vary.

    Guillain-Barré Syndrome: A disorder in which the body's immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system. Early symptoms of this disorder-such as varying degrees of weakness or tingling sensations in the legs-are similar to those caused by zinc copper deficiency. In many instances the weakness and abnormal sensations spread to the arms and upper body. These symptoms can increase in intensity until certain muscles cannot be used at all. When severe, a patient may suffer life-threatening paralysis.

    If you or someone you know has suffered from symptoms of a demyelinating disease and use denture cream, you should ask you doctor to test the zinc and copper levels in your blood. That way, your doctor can rule out denture cream neuropathy before you begin any treatment.

    http://www.neuropathy-zinc-toxicity-dental-cream.com/ (01/04/09)

    Too much denture cream can lead to neurological damage

    Denture Cream

    New research suggests that overuse of denture cream can cause gums to absorb hazardous trace metals, leading to neurological damage.  In the medical journal Neurology, Dr. Sharon P. Nations of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and her colleagues reported on four denture-wearing patients who developed neurological problems.

    All four patients experienced abnormally high levels of zinc in their blood, accompanied by abnormally low levels of copper.  Denture cream contains zinc and the four patients habitually used “extremely large amounts” of the cream.  Because of this, Nations and her team propose that excess denture cream use led to their neurological problems.  Patients sometimes compensate for ill-fitting dentures by applying excessive amounts of denture cream.

    A balance in the body between zinc and copper must be maintained in order to experience neurological health.  Ingesting too much of either metal can cause depletion of the other metal. Normal blood levels of copper range from 0.75 to 1.45 micrograms per milliliter (mL); levels for the patients in the study ranged from under 0.1 to 0.23 micrograms per mL.  Although 1.10 micrograms per mL is the highest normal number for zinc blood levels, patients in the study tested with levels ranging from 1.36 to 4.28 micrograms per mL.  Testing revealed zinc concentrations were between 17,000 and 34,000 micrograms per gram in the denture creams the patients used.  The researchers report that this is the only “plausible explanation” for their high zinc levels and copper deficiencies.

    In one case, a patient’s symptoms included weakness in the hands and poor balance, another experienced sufficient weakness in her arms and legs that she was rendered wheelchair dependent.  She also experienced cognitive decline and urinary incontinence.  The patients indicated “mild neurologic improvement” after they stopped using denture cream and began taking copper supplements.  Another patient took copper supplements but didn’t stop using denture cream.  Although his copper levels improved, his zinc levels remained too high.  No improvement in neurological symptoms was experienced in this case. The fourth patient took copper supplements and stopped using denture cream and showed improvement in copper and zinc levels, but showed no improvement in neurological symptoms.

    Used as recommended, a tube of denture cream should last from three to 10 weeks, the researchers note; however, the patients in the report were all using at least two tubes weekly.  Three of the four patients involved had also lost their teeth at a relatively young age, meaning they had been using “extremely large amounts of denture adhesive daily for years.”  Based on patients’ denture cream use, the researchers estimate that they each were exposed to at least 330 mg of zinc daily, far more than the recommended daily allowance of eight mg for women and 11 mg for men.  Meanwhile, in 2001, the National Academy of Sciences reported that the largest daily tolerable zinc intake is 40 mg.  Nations and her team urge people who use excessive amounts of denture cream to compensate for ill-fitting dentures to seek professional assistance regarding the devices.

    Source: NewsInferno.com © 2005 NEWSINFERNO.COM (09/09/08)

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